logo
Marking time

Marking time in May 2015

Thursday 21 May 2015

Controlled vocabulary

I’m the kind of guy who uses a controlled vocabulary to keyword his photos. This means that I use consistent words to describe things. Am I sadly obsessive? Maybe, but there are benefits.

There are about 75,000 images in my Lightroom catalog​—​some scanned, some born digital. I have assigned keywords and other useful metadata to almost all of them. For keywords I use the Getty Re­search Institute’s excellent Art & Architecture The­sau­rus, the Australian Pictorial Thesaurus, and my own controlled lists of terms for projects, places, people, and specialised subjects.

A digital camera image from my catalog. Here’s some of its metadata: Keywords: information > data > metadata; United Kingdom > London; photographer reflection; ar­chi­tec­tur­al elements > walls > exterior walls > facades > storefronts. Location metadata: 51°31’1” N, 0°8’33” W, Regent Street, London. Captured: 2010-09-06 13:07:54

Give me a few seconds and I can find images marked with rusti­cation (99 hits), or thermae (35 hits), or Lucy Marquis-Kyle (1,873 hits). As I add new images and metadata the whole collection gets richer.

Keywords: sculpture (visual work) > reliefs (sculptures) > bas-reliefs (sculpture); light (energy) > daylight [natural light]; architectural elements > friezes (ornamental areas); Italy > Pompeii; health facilities > public baths > thermae [Roman baths]; vaults (structural elements); sites (locations) > World Heritage Sites. Location metadata: 40° 45’ 2.994” N, 14° 29’ 2.43” E, Pompei, Campania, Italy. Captured: 2010-10-12 14:26:34

Permanent URL. Use it to bookmark or link to this item.   filed under  Photography + Ratbags + Words

comment on this article by private email
Monday 4 May 2015

On not collecting

Museum people are acquisitive, mostly. They thrive on adding things to their collections, and so ensuring the survival and display of those things.

But some things are better left where they are​—​like the remains of the aircraft in this photo. The site is on the Cox Peninsular, west of Darwin, where a B-24 Liberator bomber crashed in Janu­ary 1945, killing the six American crewmen. Components of the plane now lie scattered across the site, among trees that have grown up in the seventy years since the crash.

The bits of the plane, left in the tropical scrub where they fell, evoke this dramatic event. The same bits, if they were taken away to a museum, would not have the same evocative power.

The crash site is marked with a red pin on this map of the area. More information about the site is in an article in the 380th Bomb Group Association newsletter, a web page, and another web page.

Permanent URL. Use it to bookmark or link to this item.   filed under  Collecting

comment on this article by private email
Search marquis-kyle.com.au

On this page
Controlled vocabulary
On not collecting

Monthly archive
2017 S A J J M A M F J
2016 D N O S A J J M A M F J
2015 D N O S A J J M A M F J
2014 D N O S A J J M A M F J
2013 D N O S A J J M A M F J
2012 D N O S A J J M A M F J
2011 D N O S A J J M A M F J
2010 D N O S A J J M A M F J
2009 D N O S A J J M A M F J
2008 D N O S A J J M A M F J
2007 D N O S A J J M A M F J
2006 D N O S A J J M A M F J
2005 D N O S A J J M A M F J
2004 D N O S A J J M A M F J
2003 D N O S A J J M A M F J
2002 D N O S A J J M A M F J
2001 D N

Subject archive
Archaeology
Architecture
Collecting
Conservation
Design
Environment
Food
History
Lighthouses
Maps
Me
Photography
Prints
Ratbags
Reviews
Society
Technology
The web
This site
Tools
Typography
Words

About marking time

RSS

©
Contact me