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Marking time

Marking time on words

Thursday 17 April 2014

Britannica landscape

Here’s something delightful​—​24 volumes of an Encyclopaedia Britannica transformed into a mountain landscape by the artist Guy Laramée. I have already admitted to a liking for the printed Britannica, but I know that’s outmoded. Thanks to the blog Colossal for re­veal­ing this work to me.

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Monday 18 November 2013

Developing heritage places

I was delighted to hear that the recently published guideline Developing heritage places: using the development criteria has received a commendation from the Planning Institute of Aus­tra­lia. This is what the award judges wrote about the document:

The ‘Developing Heritages Places’ document is a clear and rigorous checklist of assessment criteria and considerations for stakeholders involved in site-specific development pro­pos­als relating to a Queensland heritage place.
      The checklist is supported by more detailed case studies and recommended (as opposed to required) actions to in­form the development of proposals, preparation of better development applications and prelodgement meetings with assessment authorities.
      The document is well presented, and as a result, will be accessible to multiple stakeholders. The judges were par­tic­u­lar­ly impressed by the inclusion of photographs of ex­am­ple cases studies, the comprehensiveness of the checklist from scoping through to construction and the ‘road-testing’ of the checklist undertaken by the Department with local government.
      ‘Developing Heritage Places’ has been endorsed by the Queensland Heritage Council and the judges believe rep­re­sent a model to be implemented in other jurisdictions moving forward
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Friday 1 November 2013

The Illustrated Burra Charter: how to buy it online

The Illustrated Burra Charter: good practice for heritage places has been widely accepted, often cited, and sometimes com­men­ded. But, sadly, the book has never been widely promoted or distributed.

It is hard to find a copy for sale in a book­shop or on the web. I have had quite a few enquiries from people who want­ed to buy one, but who couldn’t find a convenient source. In the past I have sent those people to the Australia ICOMOS website, where the online ordering process is a reminder of life before amazon.com.

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Tuesday 10 September 2013

Esoteric London: the book

Every morning, over a nice cup of tea, I check the Esoteric London blog and enjoy another quirky juxtaposition of a new photograph and a bit of old text. It’s a pleasure, and sometimes a hazardous distraction.

Roger Dean, the photographer and blogger, has been working on a self-published book which is now, at last, almost ready to print. This is not some quickie print-on-demand number, but a proper book (with belly band). Roger has just launched a Kickstarter project to get the job onto the press. I’ve pledged my support!

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Wednesday 8 May 2013

Heritage impact assessment lah

Here’s a sequel to my post about heritage impact reports. Dr Lee Lik Meng, Associate Professor of planning at the Universiti Sains Malaysia, took part in Donald Ellsmore’s workshop and wrote about the experience on his blog.

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Sunday 5 May 2013

Fingerspitzengefühl

I found this delightful German word in Oliver Reichen­stein’s fine piece Learning to see. He writes about design that combines functional and aesthetic value​—​You don’t get there with cos­metics, you get there by taking care of the details, by polishing and refining what you have. This is ultimately a matter of trained taste, or what German speakers call “Finger­spitzen­gefühl” (literally, “finger-tip-feeling”). He adds a photo of Jan Tschichold to illustrate.

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Wednesday 20 March 2013

Heritage impact reports

My colleague Donald Ellsmore asked me if I had ever seen a half decent heritage impact assessment in 10 pages or less.

I replied: I favour reports that are as short as possible (but as long as necessary…). The length needs to vary with the com­plex­ity of the issues and the nature of the other consultants’ reports in the development application. I am used to writing impact reports that go alongside stuff prepared by design architects and by town planners (who never learned brevity, or have since forgotten about it).

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Monday 11 February 2013

This predilection for sea idiom

This predeliction [sic] for sea idiom is assuredly proper in a maritime people, especially as many of the phrases are at once graphic, terse, and perspicuous. How could the where­abouts of an aching tooth be better pointed out to an op­er­a­tive dentist than Jack’s “’Tis the aftermost grinder aloft, on the starboard quarter.”* The ship expressions preserve many British and Anglo-Saxon words, with their quaint old preterites and telling colloquialisms; and such may require explanation, as well for the youthful aspirant as for the cocoa-nut-headed prelector in nautic lore. It is indeed remarkable how largely that foundation of the En­glish language has been preserved by means of our sailors.

—​from the Introduction to Admiral W H Smyth’s, The sailor’s word book: an alphabetical digest of nautical terms (London: Blackie and Son, 1867), page 6.

* my emphasis
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Wednesday 26 December 2012

Lucy

Thanks to the on-line OED I now know that lucy is the name of a fish​—​the northern pike, Esox lucius. Wikipedia adds some more detail: In heraldry, the pike is called a lucy. It is usually bla­zoned either naiant (swimming), embowed (bowed) or hauriant (jumping), though pairs of lucies may appear addorsed (back to back)…

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Wednesday 26 December 2012

Sally

I was delighted to find a new meaning of the word sally. I’ll let Charles Dickens explain, as he describes a visit to St Saviour’s Church at Southwark (now Southwark Cathedral). He has just climbed the stone stairs up to the bell ringers’ room in the tower…

The ropes of the twelve bells pass through holes in the ceiling, and reach the floor. Under each is a little raised platform for the ringer to stand on, with a strap for his foot to help him in getting a good purchase and each rope half way up is covered by some four feet by a fluffy, woolly looking covering, technically called a “sally” and intended to afford a good hold to the ringer as he checks his bell in the pull down.​—​Charles Dickens, All the year round, 27 February 1869. [via].
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Saturday 3 November 2012

A visit to the Eddystone Lighthouse

I feel guilty, just a little, because I support the vandals who cut up old books and magazines. I am part of that awful trade. I search for bits of paper on eBay, and I pay money to dealers. Forgive me.

But I rationalise that it’s a small transgression. If I don’t buy those bits of paper, somebody else will; and if nobody wants them, they’ll all go to landfill.

I paid a dealer to send me some pages pulled from a bound volume of the Strand Magazine (Volume IV, July-December 1892)​—​an article written and illustrated by F G Kitton, de­scribing a visit to the Eddystone lighthouse. It’s a nicely written piece that gave me a peak into the offshore light keepers’ life.

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Friday 11 November 2011

Renaming the Great War

This is a fitting day to mention some clever projects that Tim Sherrat has done to extract and process information from a mass of digital data. He describes in his blog how he worked with the Trove archive of Australian newspapers to see when people stop­ped talking about the Great War and started talking about the First World War. He discussed a wider range of work concerning the Great War in a keynote address.

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Monday 29 August 2011

The virtues of the snail

Was this gastropod outcomes-driven? And surely there should have been a pair of them?

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Friday 17 April 2009

50 years of Strunk & White

The elements of style (3rd edition, 1979) lurks on the shelf near my dictionaries and style guides. Some of its specific advice on grammar is weird, so it’s not a useful reference book. But as an argument for clarity in writing it’s wonderful.

White’s reworking of William Strunk’s original little book appeared in 1959, and was a publishing hit. Its anniversary has been marked by a new commemorative edition, and a flurry of comment.

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Saturday 4 April 2009

David Malouf at West End Library

My local public library opened in 1929, and today we marked it’s 80th birthday with a talk by David Malouf, and a birthday cake.

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Wednesday 30 November 2005

Apronman, bagman, chair bodger

An old favourite among my browser bookmarks: A list of occupations, compiled and published on the web by the late John J Lacombe II. It’s a collection of (mostly archaic) occupations, each briefly explained.

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Wednesday 25 May 2005

Understanding sarcasm

Yesterday I was talking to Lucy, my nine year old daughter, about irony and sarcasm and the difference between them. We looked up both words in the Collins Cobuild Dictionary:

Irony is a subtle form of humour which involves saying things that you do not mean.

Sarcasm is speech or writing which actually means the opposite of what you mean to say. Sarcasm is usually intended to mock or insult someone.

I mostly avoid sarcasm but I have a fondness for irony — a fondness that people of some other nationalities seem to lack. The dictionary can mark out a border between irony and sarcasm, with mockery and insult kept on one side. But there is contested territory where irony and sarcasm meet. Mockery and insult are feelings, not measurable commodities.

Today, I read that a research team from Haifa University has located the parts of the brain that comprehend sarcasm, according to a BBC News report.

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Thursday 7 April 2005

Oondooroo

This post commemorates a visit Thom Blake and I made to Oondooroo, a pastoral homestead outside Winton that has a remarkable collection of stone buildings. (Writing about this event is really just a pretext for linking to Thom’s website, and sooling the googlebots on to it).

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Saturday 5 February 2005

Knocking off time

In a post to the oldtools mailing list, Jeff Gorman explained the origin of ‘knocking off time’:

In case you might just want to know, the expression derives from coalmining when at the end of the shift, the miner inverts his pick and thumps the shaft end on the ground to release the head.
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Thursday 23 December 2004

Celebrating the Illustrated Burra Charter

In this, my three-hundredth posting to Marking time, I want to record that The Illustrated Burra Charter: Good Practice for Heritage Places has been launched.

Writing this book has been a long project for Meredith Walker and me. I have already mentioned it here a few times - at first draft, final draft, proofing, and printing stages. This is a project that seemed like it would never end. But now it has.

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Friday 10 December 2004

Dewey’s birthday

According to a mention in Garrison Keillor’s writer’s almanac, today is the birthday of Melvil Dewey.

This prompted me to look at the middens of paper around me, and think about Dewey’s invention of the vertical filing cabinet. Thinking turned into procrastination. Instead of putting those papers into those filing cabinets, I turned to Google. I found this book review: The social life of paper. Also see the short biographical entries in the Columbia encyclopedia and Wikipedia.

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Wednesday 11 August 2004

Checking the proofs

At last. The book should be on the press this week.

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Saturday 31 July 2004

Placeholder

Actually posted on 7 February 2005.

Until I posted this, there was nothing here for the month of July 2004. That was the month I came back from a New Zealand sabbatical and I was a bit busy. But having a missing month in the monthly archive just looked odd, and I had to fix it. So, here is a dose of lorem ipsum.

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Wednesday 16 June 2004

Ulysses in daily doses

Today is the centenary of Bloomsday, the day on which everything in James Joyce’s Ulysses took place.

I used to think Ulysses was unapproachable, until I bought myself the Naxos audio book. For long driving trips I load the four disks into the CD magazine, and switch on as soon as I get onto the highway. Jim Norton reads most of the text, with Marcella Riordan as Molly. It’s like having them in the car with me, telling me the story. It’s wonderful, and I’m not the only one who thinks so.

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Wednesday 26 May 2004

Dub dub dub

I heard this today on Radio New Zealand — Linda Clark interviewed a guest, then announced his web address: Dub-dub-dub wildlands dot cc, instead of the usual clumsy dubya-dubya-dubya…

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Monday 10 May 2004

Engravings on wood

At a second-hand bookshop in Whangarei I bought a copy of E Mervyn Taylor’s Engravings on wood (Wellington: Mermaid Press, 1957). This book displays a body of work influenced by the natural environment of New Zealand, and embedded in the European tradition of printing from engraved end-grain wood blocks. The native birds, plants (like the toi toi), landscapes and people of New Zealand were his subjects, and he engraved them with freshness.

I had not heard of him before, but this says more about my poor knowledge of New Zealand’s cultural history than it does about the artist. I know now that Mervyn Taylor (1906-1964) was a well-known and well-regarded artist.

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Friday 12 March 2004

Dan Price’s moonlight chronicles

The Morning News has a delightful interview with Dan Price, artist, writer and publisher of The moonlight chronicles.

After working as a photojournalist for 10 years I sold all my cameras and began documenting my own little life instead of everyone else’s. Using a pen and paper I was able to document what I was seeing without a machine between me and the subject. If you draw lots you can become very addicted to that peaceful state of being. It’s definitely my drug of choice!
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Tuesday 30 December 2003

Stop verbing those nouns

Kick me in the shins if I ever write anything as obscure as the following — it’s the abstract for a new book published by IBM, entitled ‘Architecting Portal Solutions’:

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Thursday 18 September 2003

Hanlon’s razor

From the Jargon lexicon: Hanlon’s Razor /prov./ A corollary of Finagle’s Law, similar to Occam’s Razor, that reads “Never attribute to malice that which can be adequately explained by stupidity.” The full entry offers some notes on the origins of the term.

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Saturday 30 August 2003

Denis O’Donovan’s library

In 1874 Denis O’Donovan became Queensland Parliamentary Librarian. He was an unlikely arrival in the colonial frontier town of Brisbane — capital of the state of Queensland, separated from New South Wales 15 years before. O’Donovan was a cultivated man, educated in Ireland and France.

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Friday 25 July 2003

Digital Gutenberg bibles II

My post about digital Gutenberg bibles has a sequel. Another Gutenberg bible has been digitised. [via kottke.org]

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Friday 30 May 2003

The month of May

Lest the month go by without leaving anything in the archive, I should explain myself. Meredith Walker and I have handed over the last draft of the new Illustrated Burra Charter book. The project-with-no-end will soon be finished.

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Friday 1 November 2002

Being Googled

I can’t explain it​—​it’s just a funny feeling that I’m being Googled​—​caption to a cartoon in the New Yorker of two men talking over drinks.

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Sunday 8 September 2002

FontBitch

Thanks to Scott Johnson for inventing the term FontBitch:

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Thursday 25 July 2002

Doggerel

Outside of a dog, a book is man’s best friend.
Inside of a dog, it’s too dark to read.

      — Groucho Marx
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Wednesday 1 May 2002

Haircut blogs and other inventions

Pseudodictionary.com collects new words and credits their inventors. So we know who to thank for the useful term haircut blog. That reminds me…

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Thursday 25 April 2002

Driving Allen Ginsberg

Elsa Dorfman's fond stories and pictures of Allen Ginsberg reminded me of the time the Beat Poet came to Brisbane.

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Tuesday 9 April 2002

Irony recognition

From a UK think-tank: We are a charitable institution, founded in 1996, devoted to ensuring that standards of English comprehension are maximised throughout the World Wide Web. Our research revealed what many had previously suspected, and reported informally — certain web users were incapable of recognising, let alone using, irony or sarcasm. This was news to me, but I am pleased to know they have a solution. It’s a web browser plug-in that uses new algorithms to alert users to irony, sarcasm, satire and parody. Downloads are free, but donations to support the research are invited.

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Saturday 30 March 2002

Pebbledash people

The BBC’s E-cyclopedia: the words behind the headlines explains a new British use of pebbledash as a term indicating suburbia. Pebbledash people is spin doctor's shorthand for a social group.

Thought to be Tories' paradigm target voter, numbering 2.5 million in 178 target seats. Derives from “pebbledash subtopia”, one of 52 postcode categories employed by market research specialists Experian. Average household income: £25,000; likely to read Daily Mail; not very neighbourly; keen on DIY.
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Thursday 28 March 2002

Engaging self obsession

Michael Barrish writes: Google changed my life. This says something about my life. I find this blogger’s self obsession engaging. He carries a bag everywhere, he says. He describes its contents in forensic detail:

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Wednesday 13 March 2002

New word: NARU

I have spotted this new word on websites and news groups. It appears as NARU, but I predict it will shift to the lower case naru as it slides from acronym to ordinary word.

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Tuesday 5 March 2002

Australian word map

Word Map is an interactive website mapping Australian regionalisms​—​words, phrases or expressions used by particular language groups. Add your regionalism or search to see what others have contributed.
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Thursday 28 February 2002

Digital Gutenberg bibles

In March 2000, ten researchers and technical experts from Keio University in Tokyo and from NTT spent two weeks in The British Library creating digital images of the two [Gutenberg] Bibles and the other related items.
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Thursday 21 February 2002

Writing by numbers: 100

The idea behind 100 words is simple: Write 100 words, no more, no less, every day.

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Wednesday 20 February 2002

Ftrain spotting

Ftrain is listed in my bookmarks under the heading blogs. But it’s not the usual daily stream of jottings and outbound links. Paul Ford writes short pieces of fiction and non-fiction, each richly linked to other pieces on the site. You can follow connections up and down a hierarchy of subjects, sideways to related pieces, or back and forth chronologically. Ftrain is built on a database of content, and (I guess) some nifty programming that maintains the pages.

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Tuesday 12 February 2002

Writing by numbers: 500

The Hoopla 500 is an experiment in text. Each entry is approximately 500 words in length, and topically can cover anything from absolute fiction to painfully detailed truth. It is not a diary, a weblog, an art project, a zine or a venue for storytelling. It [is] defined most precisely as itself: the Hoopla500. Sometimes it may be pretentious, others self effacing, but the goal is simply that it will be. In other words, its existence is the sole justification and explanation of its purpose.

That, and I like doing it. [Statement by the author, Leslie Harpold]

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Thursday 27 December 2001

Ratbag

Any person whose eccentricity I find appealing I am apt to call a ratbag. To me, it’s a word that implies fondness, an Australian idiom it seems. The British dictionaries either don’t know the word, or don’t see any positive connotation in it, and my old Websters doesn’t know the word at all. Here’s what I found:

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Monday 24 December 2001

Recipe for boredom

See this piece by Laura Calder: Recipe for boredom: why must the modern cookbook be such a flavorless affair? She quotes from Elizabeth David, Sir Hugh Platt, George Augustus Sala and Hannah Wooley to show the literary delights of the recipe, now lost. Like Hannah Wooley’s recipe from The Compleat Gentlewoman, published in 1711:

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Thursday 20 December 2001

Letterpress

I’m reading Counterpunch: making type in the sixteenth century, designing typefaces now by Fred Smeijers. Fred is a digital type designer who has gone back to the roots of printed type. He has studied early type-makers’ tools in museums, and taught himself to make type punches used for making moulds for casting type for hand setting. A fascinating book.

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Tuesday 18 December 2001

Omit unnecessary words

An unusual weblog, Textism looks good and reads well. Such economy. Just three words today​—​sometimes it snows​—​linked to wordless photographs. It’s been snowing in Pompignan. I want to go there.

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Sunday 25 November 2001

Mark time

Wait idly for something to occur, as in ‘We were just marking time until we received our instructions’. This idiom alludes to the literal meaning of marching in place to the time, or beat, of music. [Early 1800s].

—​from The American heritage dictionary of idioms by Christine Ammer.

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Search marquis-kyle.com.au

On this page
Britannica landscape
Developing heritage places
The Illustrated Burra Charter: how to buy it online
Esoteric London: the book
Heritage impact assessment lah
Fingerspitzengefühl
Heritage impact reports
This predilection for sea idiom
Lucy
Sally
A visit to the Eddystone Lighthouse
Renaming the Great War
The virtues of the snail
50 years of Strunk & White
David Malouf at West End Library
Apronman, bagman, chair bodger
Understanding sarcasm
Oondooroo
Knocking off time
Celebrating the Illustrated Burra Charter
Dewey's birthday
Checking the proofs
Placeholder
Ulysses in daily doses
Dub dub dub
Engravings on wood
Dan Price's moonlight chronicles
Stop verbing those nouns
Hanlon's razor
Denis O'Donovan's library
Digital Gutenberg bibles II
The month of May
Being Googled
FontBitch
Doggerel
Haircut blogs and other inventions
Driving Allen Ginsberg
Irony recognition
Pebbledash people
Engaging self obsession
New word: NARU
Australian word map
Digital Gutenberg bibles
Writing by numbers: 100
Ftrain spotting
Writing by numbers: 500
Ratbag
Recipe for boredom
Letterpress
Omit unnecessary words
Mark time

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